Sometimes I wish there was a better way to protest things.

Tomorrow, for example, there is a rally on my campus called “Walk out for education!” where everyone is going to leave their classes and congregate on the quad to make a fuss (I will be there, of course, I have to – as a grad student and college teacher I’m meeting both ends of the sharp stick). BUt it seems odd to me, to protest our dwindling education system by missing class-time. Granted, we can’t protest on Fridays, because the campus is technically “closed,” another lovely effect of the budget crisis, so any other day is going to have scheduled classes.

So come on everyone, let’s protest our watered-down classes by cutting down on our own class-time!

But it’s not as if all forms of social protest are nearly counter-productive. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat, and people held sit-ins, camping out in all sorts of establishments. These are great examples of non-violent protest that gets the point across effectively. Walking out of class to protest lack of classes is akin to African Americans refusing to ride the bus at all , or visit certain restaurants because they didn’t have equal rights. They wanted to right to be treated equally on buses, so they forced society to do so.

But I suppose we can’t protest budget cuts by holding a sit-in on campus, right?

My generation is, in many ways, in a bit of a tough spot. We don’t have the furvour of the 60s, yet we many of our issues are a great a threat to our future. My mom , a protester of the 60s, is always saying that we need to band together and protest things so that the authorities are forced to listen. But is our situation really solvable in that way? One might suggest that the problem of global warming can’t be solved as easily as stopping the Vietnam war. Can you compare the major issues of time periods, or are they apples and oranges?

I wonder if our generation needs some of that old blood, or to have some threat to our very existence thrown in our face. Will 20-somethings march on Washington if someone threatens their access to TV, iPods, or the blogosphere? Will “going green” become a lifestyle rather than a state of mind? Will California’s economy return the sparkle to the golden state?

I’ll be at the protest tomorrow, but whether it is the correct form of action is still yet to be seen.

 

(p.s. many many bonus point if you can figure out what movie the title comes from)

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